World War II Fallen



 
 

Debt of Honour Register


SAMUEL BLOCK

Sergeant 1378566
83 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

who died on
Wednesday 25 March 1942 . Age 33 .

Additional Information:
Son of Joseph and Hettie Block; husband of Blanche Block,
of Brighton, Sussex.

Cemetery:
EAST HAM (MARLOW ROAD) JEWISH CEMETERY
Essex, United Kingdom

Grave or Reference Panel Number:
Block I. Grave 821.

Historical Information:
This cemetery, off High Street South, belongs to the Burial
Society of the United Synagogue, Aldgate.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

DAVID BLOCK

Flight Sergeant 903489
49 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

who died on
Sunday 31 May 1942 . Age 30 .

Additional Information:
Son of Joseph and Hettie Block, of Salford, Lancashire;
husband of Phyllis Block.

Cemetery:
RUNNYMEDE MEMORIALSurrey, United Kingdom
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
Panel 73.

Location:

This Memorial overlooks the River Thames on Cooper's Hill at Englefield Green between Windsor and Egham on the A308, 4 miles from Windsor.

Historical Information:

The Air Forces Memorial at Runnymede commemorates by name over 20,000 airmen who were lost in the Second
World War during operations from bases in the United
Kingdom and North and Western Europe, and who have no known graves. They served in Bomber, Fighter, Coastal, Transport, Flying Training and Maintenance Commands, and came from all parts of the Commonwealth. Some were from countries in continental Europe which had been overrun but whose airmen continued to fight in the ranks of the Royal Air Force. The memorial was designed by Sir Edward Maufe with sculpture by Vernon Hill. The engraved glass and painted ceilings were designed by John Hutton and the poem engraved on the gallery window was written
by Paul H Scott.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry
 

RONALD COWAN

Driver T/161710
502nd Armd. Bde. Coy., Royal Army Service Corps

who died on
Sunday 18 March 1945 . Age 29 .

Additional Information:
Son of Joseph and Gertrude Cowan, of Manchester.

Cemetery:
LEOPOLDSBURG WAR CEMETERY
Leopoldsburg, Limburg, Belgium

Grave or Reference Panel
Number: I. B. 20.

Location:

Leopoldsburg War Cemetery is located 58 kilometres north east of Leuven. From Leopoldsburg railway station turn right along the Nicolaylaan to the 'T' junction and turn left onto the Koningsstraat. Continue 300 metres and turn right at the Koning Albert I Plein. 100 metres after this, turn left at the 'T' Junction and right at the next 'T' junction. Continue for a further 300 metres to the end of the road and then turn left into the Militair Domein. The cemetery is sited 200 metres along on the right.

Historical Information:

There are about 35 original burials in the cemetery
associated with isolated engagements in or near the town in May 1940. Of the remainder, some are burials from a military hospital which was established at Leopoldsburg during the latter part of 1944 and others were brought into the cemetery from the surrounding district. There are now 767 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War in the cemetery, 16 of them unidentified, and a number of Polish and Dutch war graves.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

GEORGE IVOR DE LANGE

Aircraftman 2nd Class 1068102
Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

who died on
Thursday 16 July 1942 . Age 32 .

Additional Information:
Son of George and Julie de Lange; nephew of John de Lange, of Hove, Sussex.

Cemetery:
JAKARTA WAR CEMETERY Indonesia
Grave or Reference Panel 
Number: 3. H. 15.

Location:

Jakarta (Djakarta) lies on the north-west coast of the island of Java. Djakarta War Cemetery is in the suburb of Menteng Poeloe, 11 kilometres from the city centre and is adjacent to the Netherlands Field of Honour, Jakarta Selatam (South Jakarta). It can be reached by two main roads - Jalan Dr Saharto and Jalan Casablanca. The Cemetery is entered on the northern side by a short flight of steps leading into the Memorial building. The entrance faces the old civilian cemetery where hawkers from the local market often spill  out, partly blocking access to the cemetery. The local name for the cemetery is Makam Perang Jakarta.

Historical Information:

Jakarta, the capital of the Republic of Indonesia, lies on the north-west coast of the island of Java. It was the
administrative capital of the former Netherlands East Indies and was known as Batavia, the name used in the records of the 1939-1945 War. Batavia was the port by which thousands of British and Commonwealth servicemen entered Java in February 1942 from Singapore and Sumatra, shortly before the Japanese invasion of the island. It was defended by Nos. 232 and 605 (Fighter) Squadrons from Tjililitan airfield, a few miles distant. Although greatly outnumbered and dwindling in strength, the fighters remained in action in defence of the capital from 17th-27th February. The 77th Heavy Anti-Aircraft Regiment was also employed in Batavia's defence. On 25th February H.M.S. Exeter, Electra, Encounter and Jupiter and H.M.A.S Perth sailed from Batavia to join the Eastern Striking Force at Sourabaya before meeting the Japanese in the Battle of the Java Sea (see page iv). On 1st March the Japanese landed near Batavia, by the 4th the Dutch had ordered its evacuation, and on the 5th the Japanese occupied the town.
Most of the Allied prisoners of war captured in Java were
later concentrated in a number of prison camps around
Batavia, one of the largest being "Bicycle Camp", so named because it had been the barracks of a Dutch cycle battalion.
The camp held among its first prisoners 300 survivors of
H.M.A.S. Perth, and 250 soldiers of the 2/15th Punjab
Regiment who had fought in Borneo. In 1961 at the request of the Indonesian Government, the Commonwealth dead from the Netherlands Field of Honour at Sourabaya, and from those at Palembang, Medan and Muntok in Sumatra, were brought into the cemetery, which already contained 474 Commonwealth war graves. Additional land was acquired to accommodate all the graves, and the total number of burials was increased to over 1,000. Jakarta War Cemetery therefore contains the graves of many who died in defence of Java and Sumatra during the swift Japanese
advance in 1942 and many others who perished  afterwards as prisoners of war. Among the dead were sailors who fought in the Battle of the Java Sea, soldiers of "Blackforce" including a number of Australians whose graves lie together in plot 6, and airmen who died in flying battle and airfield defence. The cemetery is entered on its northern side by a short flight of steps leading into a memorial building. Two main grass avenues cross the site, one running north-south and one east-west, and the Cross of Sacrifice stands at their intersection. The graves of members of the forces of undivided India lie on a terrace in the southern part of the cemetery. Here an Indian Forces monument has been set up; it is a stone pillar crowned by a sculptured wreath and bearing wreaths on two sides, with "INDIA" inscribed below one and "PAKISTAN" below the other. The graves are marked by bronze plaques set in concrete pedestals. The cemetery is covered with turf and planted with many
colourful sub-tropical trees and shrubs.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

DAVID FREEDMAN

Second Radio Officer
S.S. Arletta (London), Merchant Navy

who died on
Wednesday 5 August 1942 . Age 22 .

Additional Information:
Son of Herman and Annie Freedman.

Cemetery:
TOWER HILL MEMORIALLondon, United Kingdom

Grave or Reference Panel Number: 
Panel 10.

Visiting Information:

The Memorial Register may be consulted at Trinity House
Corporation, Trinity Square (Cooper's Row entrance), which will be found behind the Memorial. Tel: 020 7481 6900

Historical Information:

The Tower Hill Memorial commemorates men of the 
Merchant Navy and Fishing Fleets who died in both world
wars and who have no known grave. It stands on the south side of the garden of Trinity Square, London, close to the Tower of London. In the First World War, the civilian navy's duty was to be the supply service of the Royal Navy, to transport troops and supplies to the armies, to transport raw materials to overseas munitions factories and munitions from those factories, to maintain, on a reduced scale, the ordinary import and export trade, to supply food to the home country and - in spite of greatly enlarged risks and responsibilities - to provide both personnel and ships to supplement the existing resources of the Royal Navy. Losses of men and vessels were high from the outset, but had peaked in 1917 when in January the German government announced the adoption of "unrestricted submarine warfare". The subsequent preventative measures introduced by the Ministry of Shipping - including the setting up of the convoy system where warships were used to escort merchant vessels - led to a decrease in losses but by the end of the war, 3,305 merchant ships had been lost with a total of 17,000 lives. In the Second World War, losses were again considerable in the early years, reaching a peak in 1942.
The heaviest losses were suffered in the Atlantic, but
convoys making their way to Russia around the North Cape, and those supplying Malta in the Mediterranean were also particularly vulnerable to attack. In all, 4,786 merchant ships were lost during the war with a total of 32,000 lives. More than one quarter of this total were lost in home waters. The First World War section of the Tower Hill Memorial commemorates almost 12, 000 seamen who have no grave but the sea. The memorial was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens with sculpture by Sir William Reid-Dick. The Second World War extension, designed by Sir Edward Maufe, with sculpture by Charles Wheeler, bears almost 24,000 names.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

MERTON EUGENE GAFFIN

Corporal 2341202
18th Div. Sigs., Royal Corps of Signals

who died on
Friday 28 May 1943 . Age 23 .

Cemetery:
THANBYUZAYAT WAR CEMETERYMyanmar
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
B3. O. 1.

Location:

The village of Thanbyuzayat is 65 kilometres from Moulmein, and the war cemetery lies at the foot of the hills which separate the Union of Myanmar from Thailand. At present the only way in which the cemetery may be visited is by train. This is a long and uncomfortable journey and three days should be allocated. Only those in good health should attempt the journey. Prior permission is needed to travel to the cemetery, which is close to areas of unrest. Enquiries about the possibility of obtaining permission to visit the cemetery should be made to the nearest Union of Myanmar (Burmese) Embassy, or a Commonwealth Embassy in Yangon (Rangoon).

Historical Information:

The notorious Burma-Siam railway, built by Commonwealth, Dutch and American prisoners of war, was a Japanese project driven by the need for improved communications to support the large Japanese army in Burma. During its
construction, approximately 13,000 prisoners of war died and were buried along the railway. An estimated 80,000 to 100,000 civilians also died in the course of the project, chiefly forced labour brought from Malaya and the Dutch East Indies, or conscripted in Siam (Thailand) and Burma (Myanmar). Two labour forces, one based in Siam and the other in Burma worked from opposite ends of the line towards the centre. The Japanese aimed at completing the railway in 14 months and work began in October 1942. The line, 424 kilometres long, was completed by December 1943. The graves of those who died during the construction and maintenance of the Burma-Siam railway (except for the Americans, whose remains were repatriated) were transferred from camp burial grounds and isolated sites along the railway into three cemeteries at Chungkai and Kanchanaburi in Thailand and Thanbyuzayat in Myanmar. Thanbyuzayat became a prisoner of war administration headquarters and base camp in September 1942 and in January 1943 a base hospital was organised for the sick. The camp was close to a railway marshalling yard and workshops, and heavy casualties were sustained among the prisoners during Allied bombing raids in March and June 1943. The camp was then evacuated and the prisoners, including the sick, were marched to camps further along the line where camp hospitals were set up. For some time, however, Thanbyuzayat continued to be used as a reception
centre for the groups of prisoners arriving at frequent intervals to reinforce the parties working on the line up to the Burma-Siam border. Thanbyuzayat War Cemetery was created by the Army Graves Service who transferred to it all graves along the northern section of the railway, between Moulmein and Nieke. There are now 3,149 Commonwealth and 621 Dutch burials of the Second World war in the cemetery.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

PETER HAROLD GREENBURGH

Flying Officer 151688
Pilot 
39 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

who died on
Saturday 17 June 1944 .

Cemetery:
PHALERON WAR CEMETERYGreece
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
Joint grave 21. D. 3-4.

Location:

Phaleron War Cemetery lies a few kilometres to the South-East of Athens, at the boundary between old Phaleron district and Kalamaki district. It is on the coast road from Athens to Vouliaghmen, 5 kilometres west of the international airport.

Historical Information:

The site of what is now PHALERON WAR CEMETERY was chosen originally by the 4th Division as a burial ground for Commonwealth casualties of the Greek Civil War (December 1944-February 1945). Subsequently, the military authorities, in conjunction with the Greek Government and the Army Graves Service, decided that it would be the most suitable site for a Second World War cemetery for the whole mainland of Greece. The 23rd and 24th Graves Registration Units and the 21st and 22nd Australian War Graves Units worked together to bring in graves of the 1941 campaign from the battlefields, temporary military cemeteries and from various civil cemeteries. There are now 2,028 Commonwealth servicemen of the Second World War buried or commemorated in this cemetery. 596 of the burials are unidentified. Special memorials commemorate casualties known to have been interred in certain groups of graves in the cemetery, but whose individual graves cannot be precisely located within these groups. Other special memorials commemorate casualties re-buried in the cemetery from original graves which, owing to the destruction of local records, could not be identified. Also within the cemetery are: The PHALERON CREMATION MEMORIAL, commemorating 74 men of the army of undivided India who died during the campaigns in Greece and Crete during the Second World War and who were accorded the last rite required by their religion - committal to fire. The ATHENS MEMORIAL, commemorating nearly 3,000 members of the land forces of the Commonwealth who lost their lives during the campaigns in Greece and Crete in 1941 and 1944-1945, in the Dodecanese Islands in 1943-1945 and in Yugoslavia in 1943-1945, and who have no known grave. In the north-east corner of the cemetery, a plot contains the graves of servicemen and civilians who after serving in the Crimean War, died in Greece, and were buried in the Anglo-French Crimean Cemetery, New Phaleron. The graves were moved in 1966 when that cemetery could no longer be maintained.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

KENNETH HOLME

Flying Officer 139880
Nav.
76 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

who died on
Tuesday 31 August 1943 . Age 31 .

Additional Information:
Son of George and Agnes Holme; husband of Eileen S.
Holme, of Northenden, Cheshire.

Cemetery:
ROERMOND (KAPEL IN 'T ZAND) ROMAN CATHOLIC
CEMETERYLimburg, Netherlands
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
Plot 23. Grave 5.

Location:

Roermond is in south-east Holland, near the German border. This cemetery is in a suburb known as Kapel in 't Zand which is 1.5 kilometres south-east of the town on the Herkenboscherweg, a small side road 250 metres east of the church. The war graves are in the south-east corner of the cemetery.

Historical Information:

There are now nearly 10, 1939-1945 war casualties commemorated in this site.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

HARRY HYMAN

Third Radio Officer
M.V. Malaya II, Merchant Navy

who died on
Friday 27 June 1941 . Age 28 .

Cemetery:
TOWER HILL MEMORIALLondon, United Kingdom
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
Panel 66.

Visiting Information:

The Memorial Register may be consulted at Trinity House Corporation, Trinity Square (Cooper's Row entrance), which will be found behind the Memorial. Tel: 020 7481 6900

Historical Information:

The Tower Hill Memorial commemorates men of the Merchant Navy and Fishing Fleets who died in both world wars and who have no known grave. It stands on the south side of the garden of Trinity Square, London, close to the Tower of London. In the First World War, the civilian navy's duty was to be the supply service of the Royal Navy, to transport troops and supplies to the armies, to transport raw materials to overseas munitions factories and munitions from those factories, to maintain, on a reduced scale, the ordinary import and export trade, to supply food to the home country and - in spite of greatly enlarged risks and responsibilities - to provide both personnel and ships to supplement the existing resources of the Royal Navy. Losses of men and vessels were high from the outset, but had peaked in 1917 when in January the German government announced the adoption of "unrestricted submarine warfare". The subsequent preventative measures introduced by the Ministry of Shipping - including the setting up of the convoy system where warships were used to escort merchant vessels - led to a decrease in losses but by the end of the war, 3,305 merchant ships had been lost with a total of 17,000 lives. In the Second World War, losses were again considerable in the early years, reaching a peak in 1942. 
The heaviest losses were suffered in the Atlantic, but convoys making their way to Russia around the North Cape, and those supplying Malta in the Mediterranean were also particularly vulnerable to attack. In all, 4,786 merchant ships were lost during the war with a total of 32,000 lives. More than one quarter of this total were lost in home waters. The First World War section of the Tower Hill Memorial commemorates almost 12, 000 seamen who have no grave but the sea. The memorial was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens with sculpture by Sir William Reid-Dick. The Second World War extension, designed by Sir Edward Maufe, with sculpture by Charles Wheeler, bears almost 24,000 names.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

DONALD ALEXANDER KOMROWER

Major 164359
102 (The Northumberland Hussars) Lt. A.A./Anti-Tank Regt., Royal Artillery

who died on
Monday 18 September 1944 . Age 24 .

Additional Information:
Son of William and Adile Komrower, of Hale, Cheshire.

Cemetery:
VALKENSWAARD WAR CEMETERYNoord-Brabant, Netherlands

Grave or Reference Panel Number:
II. B. 20.

Location:

Valkenswaard is located 9 kilometres from the Dutch-Belgian frontier on the main road from Eindhoven to Hasselt in Belgium. The cemetery is 4 kilometres south of Valkenswaard town centre. From the town centre, visitors should follow signs for Hasselt (N69), and the cemetery lies on the right hand side of the road.

Historical Information:

Valkenswaard was the first village to be liberated on the main line of the British advance into Holland in September 1944. The cemetery, which lies in a pinewood, contains over 220 graves, almost all of them are those of men who fell in the fighting in the woods around Valkenswaard during that month. All the men buried here belonged to the forces of the United Kingdom.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

ALBERT LEVY

Corporal 2595827
11th Armd. Div. Sigs., Royal Corps of Signals

who died on
Tuesday 18 July 1944 . Age 24 .

Additional Information:
Son of Marco V. and Zephyrine Levy, of West Didsbury, Manchester.

Cemetery:
RANVILLE WAR CEMETERYCalvados, France
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
IV. E. 23.

Location:

Ranville is best reached by taking the D513 north-eastwards out of Caen, and after about 9 kilometres turning left at Herouvillette. Go north for one kilometre and then turn left into Ranville village. The War Cemetery is on Rue des Airbornes.

Historical Information:

The Allied offensive in north-western Europe began with the Normandy landings of 6 June 1944. Ranville was the first village to be liberated in France when the bridge over the Caen Canal was captured intact in the early hours of 6 June by troops of the 6th Airborne Division, who were landed nearby by parachute and glider. Many of the division's casualties are buried in Ranville War Cemetery and the adjoining churchyard The CEMETERY contains 2,235 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 97 of them unidentified. There are also 321 German graves and a few burials of other nationalities. The CHURCHYARD contains 47 Commonwealth burials, one of which is unidentified, and one German grave.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

JOSEPH NOAR

Sergeant 1239310
Bomb Aimer
466 (R.A.A.F.) Sqdn, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

who died on
Tuesday 31 August 1943 . Age 27 .

Additional Information:
Son of Leslie and Annie Noar, of Salford.

Cemetery:
RAINSOUGH JEWISH CEMETERYLancashire, United Kingdom
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
Higher Crumpsall Synagogue Sec. Plot B. Grave 51.

Visiting Information:

RAINSOUGH JEWISH CEMETERY, PRESTWICH (Index No. U.K. 793) This cemetery contains a number of sections, each owned by a separate Jewish authority. There are 1939-1945 service war graves in six of the sections. In addition to the 10 graves recorded in this register there is the grave of a German civilian internee in the section belonging to the Manchester Communal Burial Board.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

ARTHUR POGREL

Sergeant 1014112
Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

who died on
Wednesday 19 August 1942 . Age 25 .

Additional Information:
Son of Joseph and Yettie Pogrel, of Crumpsall, Manchester.

Cemetery:
RUNNYMEDE MEMORIALSurrey, United Kingdom
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
Panel 91.

Location:

This Memorial overlooks the River Thames on Cooper's Hill at Englefield Green between Windsor and Egham on the A308, 4 miles from Windsor.

Historical Information:

The Air Forces Memorial at Runnymede commemorates by name over 20,000 airmen who were lost in the Second World War during operations from bases in the United Kingdom and North and Western Europe, and who have no known graves. They served in Bomber, Fighter, Coastal, Transport, Flying Training and Maintenance Commands, and came from all parts of the Commonwealth. Some were from countries in continental Europe which had been overrun but whose airmen continued to fight in the ranks of the Royal Air Force. The memorial was designed by Sir Edward Maufe with sculpture by Vernon Hill. The engraved glass and painted ceilings were designed by John Hutton and the poem engraved on the gallery window was written by Paul H Scott.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

JACK TAYLOR

Warrant Officer 965198
Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

who died on
Sunday 2 July 1944 . Age 23 .

Additional Information:
Son of David and Herta Taylor, of Crumpsall, Manchester. Cemetery:

KARACHI WAR CEMETERY Pakistan
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
12. A. 7.

Location:

The cemetery is a few miles from the centre of Karachi, to the north-east on National Stadium Road and can be reached by taxi. It is now surrounded by the naval colony and is adjacent to the new naval cemetery. The easiest way to reach the War Cemetery from the city centre is to go to the National Stadium and follow the road leading to Dalmia in which the airport is situated. From the airport follow the reverse road from Dalmia to the National Stadium and the Cemetery is situated to the left hand side of National Stadium Road. Owing to constant problems the direction signs have been removed but attempts will be made at resiting them.

Historical Information:

KARACHI WAR CEMETERY was created to receive Second World War graves from civil and cantonment cemeteries scattered throughout northern Pakistan where their permanent maintenance could not be assured. The cemetery contains 642 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. The KARACHI 1939-45 WAR MEMORIAL forms the entrance to Karachi War Cemetery. It commemorates more than 25,000 servicemen of the forces of undivided India who died during the Second World War in non-operational zones. Their remains were accorded the last rites and disposal required by their various religions and their names are commemorated at memorials in Delhi and Karachi. No names appear on the memorials but a Roll of Honour at each site, one in Hindi, the other in Urdu, record the names of those commemorated. Karachi War Cemetery also contains the KARACHI 1914-18 MEMORIAL, commemorating 568 men who served in garrisons and died in Pakistan (formerly India) during the First World War and who lie buried in civil and cantonment cemeteries where their graves could no longer be maintained.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

ABRAHAM AUBREY STERNSHINE

Private 14412658
1st Bn. The Tyneside Scottish, Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

who died on
Monday 26 June 1944 . Age 19 .

Additional Information:
Son of Isidor and Nellie Sternshine, of Crumpsall, Manchester.

Cemetery:
TILLY-SUR-SEULLES WAR CEMETERYCalvados, France
Grave or Reference Panel Number:
V. C. 13.

Location:

From Bayeux, take the D6 southeastwards for about 12 kilometres to Tilly-sur-Seulles. In the centre of the town, turn right (westwards) onto the D13. The cemetery will be found after about 1 kilometre on the left hand side.

Historical Information:

The Allied offensive in north-western Europe began with the Normandy landings of 6 June 1944. There was heavy and fluctuating fighting in the vicinity of Tilly-sur-Seulles immediately after the landings involving chiefly the 49th and 50th Divisions. Tilly itself was not captured until 18 June and fighting continued nearby until mid July. The cemetery contains 990 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War and 232 German graves.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

ROBERT HENRY VALENCIA

Flight Sergeant 1814417
Air Gnr. 156 Sqdn., Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

who died on
Sunday 13 August 1944 . Age 29 .

Additional Information:
Son of Jacob Emmanuel and Kate Valencia.

Cemetery:
RHEINBERG WAR CEMETERYKamp Lintfort, Nordrhein-Westfal, Germany
Grave or Reference Panel Number: 
Joint grave 8. H. 9-10.

Location:

Rheinberg is 24 kilometres north of Krefeld and 13 kilometres south of Wesel. The cemetery is 3 kilometres south of the centre of the town of Rheinberg on the road to Kamp Lintfort. From the motorway 57, turn off at Rheinberg and at the T junction follow the 510 in the direction Kamp Lintfort. The cemetery is a short way along this road on the right.

Historical Information:

The site of Rheinberg War Cemetery was chosen in April 1946 by the Army Graves Service for the assembly of Commonwealth graves recovered from numerous German cemeteries in the area. The majority of those now buried in the cemetery were airmen, whose graves were brought in from Dusseldorf, Krefeld, Munchen-Gladbach, Essen, Aachen and Dortmund; 450 graves were from Cologne alone. The men of the other fighting services buried here mostly lost their lives during the battle of the Rhineland, or in the advance from the Rhine to the Elbe. There are now 3,326 Commonwealth servicemen of the Second World War buried or commemorated at Rheinberg War Cemetery. 156 of the burials are unidentified. There are also nine war graves of other nationalities, most of them Polish.

Commonwealth war Graves Commision entry

 

The information contained on this page is included with the kind permission of the Commonwealth war Graves Commision and is copyright the Comonwealth war graves Commision.
 
 

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